Cities of the Future

Well-heeled liberals tend to assume that everyone should live in cities, and the world would be a better place for all. People would consume less energy for transportation and temperature control. They’d get more exercise from walking and taking public transit, extending their lives. Quaint Jane Jacobs-style neighborhoods would improve people’s daily routines with friendly local businesses and amenities.

All of that’s true. But here’s why it could go a different way.

The City Is Dead
Given technology trends, there will soon be fewer reasons for cities to exist.

  • Video conferencing improves so much that physical proximity becomes irrelevant — for socializing as well as working
  • 3D nano-printers one day can create any food near instantaneously, driving most restaurants out of business, because we’ll all be able to Jetson our dinners on demand. Assuming that virtual reality doesn’t render the physicality of food irrelevant first.
  • Online shopping continues along its trend toward beating the real thing.
  • Online dating utterly replaces the in-person variety, as the recent marriage stats suggest.

If all these come to pass, what reason will be left for living in a city? It won’t matter where anyone lives.

Long Live the City
And yet, some of the benefits of cities will remain.

  • Energy efficiency
  • Greener living
  • Lower cost delivery of goods
  • Virtual reality may one day provide an adequate experience of nature

In an especially science fictional future, people might end up living in Matrix movie style pods, plugged into virtual reality, living at a density to make Tokyo seem spacious.

What do you think will happen?

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